Live Virtual Group Session: 6pm EDT October 19th 2020

Thank you to everyone who joined us for this session!

Our text for this session was the poem “The Artist” by William Carlos Williams, posted below.

Our prompt was to choose between: “Write about a moment of unexpected beauty” or “Write about a missed performance.”

More details about this session will be posted soon, so check back!

Participants are warmly encouraged to share what you wrote below (“Leave a Reply”), to keep the conversation going here, bearing in mind that the blog of course is a public space where confidentiality is not assured.

Also, we would love to learn more about your experience of these sessions, so if you’re able, please take the time to fill out a follow-up survey of one to two quick questions!

Please join us for our next session Wednesday, October 21st at 12pm EDT, with more times listed on our Live Virtual Group Sessions page.


The Artist by William Carlos Williams

Mr. T.
          bareheaded
                    in a soiled undershirt
his hair standing out
          on all sides
                    stood on his toes
heels together
           arms gracefully
                    for the moment
curled above his head.
            Then he whirled about
                     bounded
into the air
             and with an entrechat
                     perfectly achieved
completed the figure.
             My mother
                     taken by surprise
where she sat
             in her invalid’s chair
                      was left speechless.
Bravo! she cried at last
             and clapped her hands.
                       The man’s wife
came from the kitchen:
            What goes on here? she said.
                        But the show was over.

Live Virtual Group Session: 12pm EDT October 14th 2020

Thank you to everyone who joined us for this session!

Together we looked at the visual art “Television Snow” by R. Michael Wommack, posted below.

More details about this session will be posted soon, so check back!

Participants are warmly encouraged to share what you wrote below (“Leave a Reply”), to keep the conversation going here, bearing in mind that the blog of course is a public space where confidentiality is not assured.

Also, we would love to learn more about your experience of these sessions, so if you’re able, please take the time to fill out a follow-up survey of one to two quick questions!

Please join us for our next session Monday, October 19th at 6pm EDT, with more times listed on our Live Virtual Group Sessions page.


Television Snow by R. Michael Wommack


Encuentros virtuales en vivo: Martes 13 de octubre, 16:30 EST

¡Gracias por acompañarnos en esta sesión!

El texto que elegimos para esta sesión fue un poema de Mario Benedetti, llamado “No Te Rindas,” publicado a continuación. 

Escribir en conjunto: “Escribe acerca de un momento en que no te rendiste.”

¡Pronto se publicará más información sobre esta sesión!

Se alienta a los participantes a compartir lo que escribieron a continuación (“Deja una respuesta”), para mantener la conversación aquí, teniendo en cuenta que el blog, por supuesto, es un espacio público donde no se garantiza la confidencialidad.

¡Cuéntenos más sobre su experiencia en este taller completando esta breve encuesta!

Únase a nosotros para nuestra próxima sesión en español, que se anunciará pronto. Más horas enumeradas en inglés en nuestra página de sesiones de grupo virtual en vivo.


No Te Rindas | Mario Benedetti

No te rindas, aún estás a tiempo
de alcanzar y comenzar de nuevo,
aceptar tus sombras, enterrar tus miedos,
liberar el lastre, retomar el vuelo.

No te rindas que la vida es eso,
continuar el viaje,
perseguir tus sueños,
destrabar el tiempo,
correr los escombros y destapar el cielo.

No te rindas, por favor no cedas,
aunque el frío queme,
aunque el miedo muerda,
aunque el sol se esconda y se calle el viento,
aún hay fuego en tu alma,
aún hay vida en tus sueños,
porque la vida es tuya y tuyo también el deseo,
porque lo has querido y porque te quiero.

Porque existe el vino y el amor, es cierto,
porque no hay heridas que no cure el tiempo,
abrir las puertas quitar los cerrojos,
abandonar las murallas que te protegieron.

Vivir la vida y aceptar el reto,
recuperar la risa, ensayar un canto,
bajar la guardia y extender las manos,
desplegar las alas e intentar de nuevo,
celebrar la vida y retomar los cielos.

No te rindas, por favor no cedas,
aunque el frío queme,
aunque el miedo muerda,
aunque el sol se ponga y se calle el viento,
aún hay fuego en tu alma,
aún hay vida en tus sueños,
porque cada día es un comienzo,
porque esta es la hora y el mejor momento,
porque no estás sola,
porque yo te quiero.

Live Virtual Group Session: 6pm EDT October 12th 2020

Thank you to everyone who joined us for this session!

Our text was the poem “The Snow Mare” by N. Scott Momaday, posted below.

Our prompt was: “Write about bursts of soft commotion.

More details about this session will be posted soon, so check back!

Participants are warmly encouraged to share what you wrote below (“Leave a Reply”), to keep the conversation going here, bearing in mind that the blog of course is a public space where confidentiality is not assured.

Also, we would love to learn more about your experience of these sessions, so if you’re able, please take the time to fill out a follow-up survey of one to two quick questions!

Please join us for our next session Monday, October 14th at 12pm EDT, with more times listed on our Live Virtual Group Sessions page.


The Snow Mare by N. Scott Momaday

In my dream, a blue mare loping,
Pewter on a porcelain field, away.
There are bursts of soft commotion
Where her hooves drive in the drifts,
And as dusk ebbs on the plane of night,
She shears the web of winter,
And on the far, blind side
She is no more. I behold nothing,
Wherein the mare dissolves in memory,
Beyond the burden Of being.

Live Virtual Group Session: 12pm EDT October 7th 2020

Thank you to everyone who joined us for this session!

Our text was the poem “The Death of Marilyn Monroe” by Sharon Olds, posted below.

Our prompt was: “Write about a time you stood in a doorway.”

More details about this session will be posted soon, so check back!

Participants are warmly encouraged to share what you wrote below (“Leave a Reply”), to keep the conversation going here, bearing in mind that the blog of course is a public space where confidentiality is not assured.

Also, we would love to learn more about your experience of these sessions, so if you’re able, please take the time to fill out a follow-up survey of one to two quick questions!

Please join us for our next session Monday, October 12th at 6pm EDT, with more times listed on our Live Virtual Group Sessions page.


The Death of Marilyn Monroe  by Sharon Olds

The ambulance men touched her cold
body, lifted it, cold as iron,
onto the stretcher, tried to close the
mouth, closed the eyes, tied the
arms to the sides, moved a caught
strand of hair, as if it mattered,
saw the shape of her breasts, flattened by
gravity, under the sheet,
carried her, as if it were she,
down the steps.

These men were never the same. They went out
afterwards, as they always did,
for a drink or two, but they could not meet
each other’s eyes.

                             Their lives took
a turn--one had nightmares, strange
pains, impotence, depression. One did not
like his work, his wife looked
different, his kids. Even death
seemed different to him–a place where she
would be waiting,

and one found himself standing at night
in the doorway to a room of sleep, listening to a
woman breathing, just an ordinary
woman
breathing.



"Death of Marilyn Monroe," by Sharon Olds 
from The Dead and the Living (Alfred A. Knopf).

Live Virtual Group Session: 6pm EDT October 5th 2020

Thank you to everyone who joined us for this session!

Our text was the poem “Ode to a Pair of Scissors” by Pablo Neruda, posted below.

Our prompt was: “Write an ode to something common.”

More details about this session will be posted soon, so check back!

Participants are warmly encouraged to share what you wrote below (“Leave a Reply”), to keep the conversation going here, bearing in mind that the blog of course is a public space where confidentiality is not assured.

Also, we would love to learn more about your experience of these sessions, so if you’re able, please take the time to fill out a follow-up survey of one to two quick questions!

Please join us for our next session Wednesday, October 7th at 12pm EDT, with more times listed on our Live Virtual Group Sessions page.


"Ode to a Pair of Scissors" by Pablo Neruda

Prodigious scissors
(looking like birds, or fish),
you are as polished as a knight’s
shining armor.
 
Two long and treacherous
knives
crossed and bound together
for all time,
two
tiny rivers
joined:
thus was born a creature for cutting,
a fish that swims among billowing linens,
a bird that flies
through
barbershops.
 
Scissors
that smell of
my seamstress
aunt’s
hands
when their vacant
metal eye
spied on
our
cramped childhood,
tattling
to the neighbors
about our thefts of plums and kisses.
There,
in the house,
nestled in their corner,
the scissors crossed
our lives,
and oh so
many lengths of
fabric
that they cut and kept on cutting:
for newlyweds and the dead,
for newborns and hospital wards.
They cut
and kept on cutting,
also the peasant’s
hair
as tough
as a plant that clings to rock,
and flags
soon
stained and scorched
by blood and flame,
and vine
stalks in winter,
and the cord
of
voices
on the telephone.
 
A long-lost pair of scissors
cut your mother’s
thread
from your navel
and handed you for all time
your separate existence.
Another pair, not necessarily
somber,
will one day cut
the suit you wear to your grave.
 
Scissors
have gone
everywhere,
they’ve explored
the world
snipping off pieces of
happiness
and sadness
indifferently.
Everything has been material
for scissors to shape:
the tailor’s
giant
scissors,
as lovely as schooners,
and very small ones
for trimming nails
in the shape
of the waning moon,
and the surgeon’s
slender
submarine scissors
that cut the complications
and the knot that should not have grown inside you. 
 
Now, I’ll cut this ode short
with the scissors
of good sense,
so that it won’t be too long or too short,
so that it
will
fit in your pocket
smoothed and folded
like
a pair
of scissors.
 
                                                                       
Pablo Neruda
Ode to Common Things 
New York: Bullfinch Press: 1994
Translator Ken Krabbenhoft

Laboratori Di Medicina Narrativa: sabato 3 ottobre dalle 16 alle 17.30

Siamo stati molto lieti di avervi avuti con noi!

Abbiamo letto insieme estratti da Questa libertà di Pierluigi Cappello, che trovate alla fine. 

Poi, abbiamo scritto ispirati dallo stimolo: “Descrivi la muraglia che ti accompagna”.

Al più presto, condivideremo un breve riassunto della sessione. Vi invitiamo a visitare di nuovo questa pagina nei prossimi giorni.

Se avete partecipato al laboratorio, potete condividere i vostri scritti alla fine della pagina (“Leave a Reply”). Attraverso questo forum speriamo di creare uno spazio per continuare la nostra conversazione!

Stiamo raccogliendo impressioni e breve feedback sui nostri laboratori di medicina narrativa su Zoom!

Questo breve questionario (anonimo, e aperto a chiunque abbia frequentato almeno un laboratorio) è molto importante per noi, e ci permetterà di elaborare sul valore dei nostri laboratori e sul ruolo dello spazio per riflettere e metabolizzare il momento presente. Vi preghiamo quindi di condividere le nostre riflessioni con noi! 


(Pierluigi Cappello, Questa libertà, 2013)

Si era affacciato il sole dopo che durante la mattinata era piovuto, ora tutto accecava nel riflesso della luce sulle cose ancora bagnate. Tra un lembo di nuvola e l’altro si apriva un azzurro che pareva appena battuto dal conio della creazione. In basso c’era una strada con un paio di utilitarie parcheggiate all’ombra di un muro che si levava altissimo, superava il mio sguardo. In cima graffiavano l’aria, con i loro segni neri, dei ferri ritorti in mezzo ai quali, battuti dal sole, dei cocci di bottiglia brillavano come diamanti nell’azzurro immacolato di quel pezzo di cielo.

Sentire con triste meraviglia / come tutta la vita e il suo travaglio / in questo seguitare una muraglia / che ha in cima cocci aguzzi di bottiglia. I quattro versi non uscirono zampillanti, lucidi e di un colpo solo, così come li riporto adesso sulla pagina: affiorarono un poco per volta. Dalla nebbia, come il profilo di un’isola misteriosa.  Solo l’ultimo risalì la memoria tutto intero, il resto si agganciò a parole forti come “meraviglia”, “travaglio”, “seguitare”, finché la catena di suoni si ricompose, proveniente da chissà quale pomeriggio trascorso in sala studio quando ero in collegio.

Così il muro, che seppi poi cingere un magazzino dei Monopoli di Stato, fece irruzione nella poesia di Montale, dando concretezza a quei versi che, a loro volta, ne illuminavano la superficie bruta in cemento armato, i ferri dentro la pancia del cielo, i cocci di bottiglia battuti dalla luce. E l’impressione che quelle parole fossero state scritte proprio per me, rompendo la solitudine di quel preciso momento in cui venni tentato dall’appoggiare la fronte sul vetro, diventò il sangue e l’ossigeno che attraversavano la mia carne, lasciandomi l’idea che, in qualche caso, il dolore può essere compreso. Che il dolore può essere portato dentro intatto e inoffensivo, come un proiettile che si è fermato accanto al cuore e che nessun chirurgo è stato capace di estrarre. Tutto qui, se hai la fortuna che le parole ti vengano incontro e che, nella comprensione, sciolgano il nodo del male in una forma di desolata serenità che ti accompagna per il resto della vita. (…)

Da quel giorno la muraglia venne con me fino al momento delle dimissioni, mi seguì mentre andavo in palestra, dove l’obiettivo non era più di limare di un decimo di secondo il mio tempo sui cento metri, ma fare male le cose che prima facevo con naturalezza: stava accanto a me quando andavo al bar dell’ospedale; era lì nel momento in cui i miei genitori capirono che non ci sarebbero stati né stampelle né bastoni a sorreggermi. Mi accompagnò ogni giorno di quei giorni e di quei mesi, la muraglia, mettendomi dentro la consapevolezza che ognuno di noi porta in sé un limite che è anche una soglia. Delle colonne d’Ercole che rappresentano l’invito a essere superate.

Sono entrato in pronto soccorso la sera del dieci settembre 1983. Sono uscito dall’istituto di riabilitazione nella mattinata del sedici marzo del 1985. Sono date che si possono scrivere anche così: 10/09/1983 – 16/03/1985, con il trattino in mezzo. E benché inizio e fine abbiano importanza, è quel trattino teso fra loro come una fune che riempie di senso l’una e l’altra e, illuminando, avvicina le due sponde. Come un funambolo, quella fune mi sono impegnato a percorrerla tutta, cercando di rimanere in equilibrio tra soprassalti e incertezze e, soprattutto, evitando di farmi sbilanciare dalla paura di un baratro spalancato sotto i miei piedi. (…) Dentro quel trattino fra due date posso metterci poche certezze. (…) Ma ciò che è rimasto in piedi e che ha rappresentato la linea continua tra la vita di prima e la vita di dopo, è stata la letteratura. Anzi, la passione si è liberata dal peso delle regole del branco. Ridotta a una vita clandestina durante gli anni di collegio e di studio, ora bruciava più che mai. Mostrava i segni del suo divampare nell’affollato strepito di libri e riviste che ormai ingombrava per intero il lungo davanzale della finestra e della mia parte di armadietto. Non mi accontentavo più di utilizzare i libri come un mezzo di trasporto per andare via lontano, ora volevo catturarne e trattenerne la polpa via (…)

Il sedici marzo del 1985 avevo paura. Custodito dal ventre tiepido dell’ospedale, avrei voluto rimanere lì, nella mia camera, a fare il monaco amanuense. Mi sarei accontentato di poco, qualche libro, qualche quaderno, una biro. Sarei stato un prigioniero intorpidito e felice. Mentre aspettavo mio padre, guardai il lungo davanzale vuoto, il letto ancora sfatto che era stato la mia isola di Circe. Le sue pieghe, nascondendomelo, mi avevano nascosto al mondo. All’arrivo di mio padre ero sul punto di piangere. (…)

Quando Cortez sbarcò sulle coste del Messico, fece bruciare le navi. Con quel gesto intendeva spingere dentro la polpa di un mondo sconosciuto il coraggio dei suoi archibugieri. Innervato dalla disperazione, quel coraggio sarebbe diventato ferocia e quella ferocia avrebbe abbattuto un impero. Nel momento in cui mio padre prese la borsa da viaggio, io, senza la ferocia di Cortez, con una spinta decisa alla carrozzina, lasciai bruciare le mie caravelle alle spalle. Davanti la porta automatica si spalancò su un continente ignoto.


Narrative Medicine Book Club: Magic Mountain, Week 19

Week 19: Whew, what an ending! A bloody duel between Settembrini and Naphta, followed by the onset of World War I and the quick disassembly of the community we have been in for the duration. Then, in the final pages, a tour-de-force last scene depicting Castorp, our “simple fellow,” just one of thousands running through a landscape of exploding shells and fallen bodies. A satisfying feeling, to reach the end of a book and feel that the whole novel has been leading you to that last scene without your knowing it, and that the novel’s ending casts you back over the whole book. So much to say – I can’t wait to talk about this more with all of you tomorrow!

Join for our last zoom at 11 am Saturday, registration below! 

https://columbiacuimc.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAlfu-gpjIqHtHaXaxCJWHzj3LPLknFD_TW